Global Family Planning movement re-energized

The London Summit on Family Planning ended on July 11th with at least 49 countries committing to improve family planning services, and many more are making commitments towards attaining the 120 million more users by 2020 – a goal set in 2012.

The family planning movement gained an impetus at the first London Summit five years ago, and today the landscape has changed; the global community has accumulated a number of lessons, substantive data and evidence, strengthened supply chains, and stronger partnerships.

Committing countries – 38 prior to the second London Summit – are not only committing domestic resources to family planning, but also mobilizing leadership at national, sub-national level, and enlisting cultural, religious and influential leaders to rally communities behind family planning.

“In 2012, the goal was purposefully set high: 120 million reached with family planning information, services, and supplies,” said Melinda Gates during a plenary session. And the Summit was a demonstration of collective accountability and a reflection of increased dedication to the cause.

The global community remains optimistic, and re-energized to accelerate progress to attaining voluntary, quality family planning services, despite reaching 30.4 million women thus far. The gathering witnessed a number of commitments made: a total of 64 new policy and financial commitments in developing countries, donors, civil society organizations, and private companies; USD1.5 billion in new financial commitments by countries in Africa and Asia, USD 660 million in new donor financing, and USD 19 million in new private sector commitments.

Reframing family planning within the sexual and reproductive health agenda would bring in a cross section of actors to work towards the goal, but most importantly, situate family planning as a tool to alleviate poverty. A number of speakers at the Summit reframed family planning as an anti-poverty intervention, a message likely to resonate with most governments especially in developing countries.

So as the dust settles after the Summit, all actors – donors, governments, private corporates, CSOs – are now challenged with putting the commitments to action, building on the work done so far, and more strongly, using the generated evidence towards implementing more effective interventions.

Photo caption: From left to right: Dr. Natalia Kanem, Acting Executive Director, UNFPA; Hon. Minister Marie-Claude Bibeau, Minister of International Development and La Francophonie for Canada; Hon. Dr. Jane Ruth Aceng (Achang), Minister of Health, Uganda; and Melinda Gates, Co-chair of the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation

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